2017 Special Exhibition Little Compton’s 20th-Century Artists

Aldrich_Sails Ready_watercolor Pam Church (1)

Exhibit Preview Party          Friday, June 30           6-8 pm

Family Day Celebration       Saturday, July 1         1-4 pm

We Need Your Help!

Almost 30 volunteers have been working for months researching the lives and work of Little Compton’s 20th-century artists. Thanks to your suggestions, we’ve complied a list of over 30 professional artists and talented Sunday Painters  to be included in this season’s special exhibition. Though we can only display a few pieces from each artist, we are creating an archive for each participant and would like to have digital images of as many pieces of their work as possible. If you own a piece by one of these artists, please send a photograph of it to lchistory@littlecompton.org and please indicate whether or not it is available for loan this season.

The Exhibit Committee is making decisions on which pieces will hang in the exhibit throughout April.

We are especially in need of artwork by C. Gordon Harris, Lloyd Goodrich, Edwin Blashfield, Eric Denard, Gus Kelley, Hazard Durfee and Tom Sullivan, but photos of artwork from any of the artists will help improve our archival collection.

Artists must have a strong connection to Little Compton, must have done a significant body of work in the 20th century, and must be deceased.

The painting above is by David Aldrich and is in a private collection.

List of Artists

David Aldrich

Doris Beattie

Edwin Blashfield

Jane Carrott Boardman

Deborah Bodington

Sydney Burleigh

Bryson Burroughs

Eleanor “Nunnie” Atwater Byers

Eric Denard

Hazard Durfee

Bill Ferguson –

Jennie Furbish

Lloyd Goodrich

C. Gordon Harris

Hope Hudner

Blackmer Humphrey

Ann Jewell

Augusta Kelley

Gus Kelley

Richard Kinnicutt

Molly Luce

Fred Dana Marsh

Reginald Marsh

Virginia Moore

Audrey Buller Parsons

Lloyd Parsons

Mary E. Post

Katherine Schmidt Shubert

Elsie Straight

Tom Sullivan

Brooks Wall

Lois Wilcox

Susan Wise Walker

Betts Burroughs Woodhouse

Two Generations of Freedom: From Kofi to Paul Cuffe

 JOIN US on Wednesday, February 1, 2017 at 7 PM at the Little Compton Community Center, when Jeffrey Fortiprofessor-jeffrey-fortinn will present “Two Generations of Freedom: From Kofi to Paul Cuffe.” Professor Fortin will share the stories of Kofi Slocum, an African man enslaved in Westport, MA, who secured his freedom, and his son, Quaker businessman and sea captain, Paul Cuffe. During his lifetime, Paul Cuffe (1759-1817) was one of the most prosperous and politically active men of color in America. Dr. Fortin is the Paul Cuffe Fellow at Mystic Seaport Museum and Assistant Professor of History at Emmanuel College. His book on the life of Paul Cuffe will be published shortly.

The talk is free and open to the public.

It is part of the Little Compton Historical Society’s Slavery and Freedom Speakers’ Series and is sponsored by the Rhode Island Council for the Humanities, an independent state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Later in the month the last talk in the series will take place on Thursday, February 23, 2017 at 7PM, when Tony Connors, President of the Westport Historical Society, will present “Westport’s Stories of Unfreedom” based on his extensive research using Westport’s primary source documents. Through the years changing borders and family connections have created strong ties between Westport’s and Little Compton’s historic people of color.

Race in Dialogue

Join us as our Slavery and Freedom Speakers’ Series continues Wednesday, January 25 at 7 PM at the Little Compton Community Center with Elon Cook, Program Manager and Curator for The Center for Reconciliation. Elon will present, “Race in Dialogue: Where do we go from here?” She will discuss why The Center for Reconciliation in Providence was created by the Episcopal Diocese of Rhode Island and how individuals, churches and communities across Rhode Island can join statewide dialogues on race and our history of slavery. Sponsored by the Rhode Island Council for the Humanities. Free and open to the public.

elon-cook-e1435704625206-640x960

Visit Us This Winter!

slavery-exhibit-3

Now through February 28, 2017, stop by anytime the office is open, normally Tuesday – Friday from 9 to 3, to see our award-winning special exhibition If Jane Should Want to Be Sold, Stories of Enslavement, Indenture and Freedom in Little Compton, Rhode Island or to purchase something in our museum shop.

We are also open every Saturday from 1 to 5 PM through February, and in addition to seeing the exhibit you may also request a tour of the Wilbor House Museum c. 1690.  Bring your mittens!

Open Christmas Eve and New Year’s Eve from 1 to 5 PM.  Great way to grab a last minute gift or entertain out-of-town visitors.

Our staff is small, and is sometimes called away for out-of-of-the-office meetings.  Please call before you visit to avoid disappointment.

Slavery and Freedom Speakers’ Series Continues November 2 with Keith Stokes

keith_hdKeith Stokes will share his expertise on the history of enslaved and free African Americans in Newport, Rhode Island on Wednesday, November 2 at the United Congregational Church on the Little Compton, Commons at 7 PM. His talk is entitled “American Irony: Religious Freedom and Slavery in Colonial Newport” is the next offering in the Historical Society’s Slavery and Freedom Speaker’s Series sponsored by the Rhode Island Historical Society.

“American Irony: Religious Freedom and Slavery in Colonial Newport” presents the simultaneous rise of religious freedom and African enslavement in Colonial Rhode Island. The presentation explores the religious, civic and commerce evolution of Newport through the eyes and experiences of enslaved and, later free, African men, women and children, including the founding of several of the earliest free African education, social and religious institutions in America.

Mr. Stokes is the co-founder of the 1696 Heritage Group, an organization dedicated to the study and sharing of African-American history in Newport. The talk is free and open to the public.

The Little Compton Historical Society’s Slavery and Freedom Speaker Series is part of a year-long project honoring the 200th anniversary of the end of slavery in Little Compton. The Society has spent three years investigating the history of slavery in Little Compton and now offers a book and a special exhibition on the subject entitled “If Jane Should Want to Be Sold, Stories of Slavery, Indenture and Freedom in Little Compton, Rhode Island.” The exhibition is open every Saturday from 1 to 5 PM through February. Admission is free to members of the Little Compton Historical Society and $5 for non-members.

Other talks in the Slavery and Freedom Speakers series include:

On January 25, 2017 at 7PM, at the Little Compton Community Center, Elon Cook, Program Manager & Curator of the new Center for Reconciliation for the Episcopal Diocese of Rhode Island will speak on the exciting work of the Center for Reconciliation and how institutions and individuals can collaborate to increase public knowledge about slavery and Rhode Island’s role in the international slave trade.

On Wednesday, February 1, 2017 at 7 PM at the Community Center, Jeffrey Fortin will present “Two Generations of Freedom: From Kofi to Paul Cuffe.”  Dr. Fortin is the Paul Cuffe Fellow at Mystic Seaport Museum and Assistant Professor of History at Emmanuel College. His book on the life of Paul Cuffe will be published soon.

Last in the series on Thursday, February 23, 2017 at 7PM at the Community Center, Tony Connors, President of the Westport Historical Society, will present “Westport’s Stories of Unfreedom” based on his extensive research using Westport’s primary source documents.

 

 

 

 

Kevin Ryan to Speak on Present Day Human Trafficking – October 21 – 1 PM

Keimg_3986vin Ryan, President and CEO of Covenant House International is the next speaker in the Little Compton Historical Society’s series exploring slavery and freedom. The series is made possible by the Rhode Island Council for the Humanities and will run through February, 2017. Each event is free and open to the public.

Covenant House is the largest charity across the hemisphere serving homeless and trafficked youth. Each year, the charity reaches more than 50,000 children and youth across 30 cities in six countries. Mr. Ryan will speak Friday, October 21 at 1 pm at the Little Compton Community Center. He will discuss the harsh realities and devastating consequences of human trafficking in the United States and across the word today, especially as it pertains to the homeless children, teens and young adults who seek help from Covenant House. Legal slavery ended in Little Compton two hundred years ago, and in the United States in 1865, but the reality of illegal slavery continued and still continues today.

Kevin Ryan is a best selling author, father, husband and child advocate. He arrived at Covenant House in 1992 to provide legal assistance to homeless youth and he now leads Covenant House International, whose work has been awarded the Conrad Hilton Humanitarian Award and the Olaf Palme Peace Prize.

Over the past five years, Kevin Ryan and his Covenant House team have built an international Sleep Out movement, involving thousands of participants across two countries who sleep outside for one night and raise funds  to house, train and help homeless youth who are most at risk for human trafficking.

Mr. Ryan previously served as New Jersey’s first public Child Advocate and first commissioner of the Department of Children and Families. His first book, “Almost Home,” a collaboration with former New York Times reporter Tina Kelley, became a national best seller in the Fall of 2012. The book chronicles the lives of six homeless teenagers as they faced abuse, violence and heartbreak in search of a place to call home. “Almost Home” will be available for sale before and after his talk in Little Compton.

In 2015, President Barack Obama appointed Mr. Ryan as a member of the President’s Advisory Council on Faith Based and Neighborhood Partnerships.

Kevin Ryan is a graduate of Catholic University, Georgetown Law Center and NYU Law School. His numerous media appearances include the TODAY Show, Good Morning America and two appearances on 60 Minutes. He lives in Fair Haven, NJ with his wife Clare Neitzey Ryan, a Little Compton native. Together with their six children, they make frequent trips to visit their family in Little Compton.

The Little Compton Historical Society’s Slavery and Freedom Speaker Series is part of a year-long project honoring the 200th anniversary of the end of slavery in Little Compton. The Society has spent three years investigating the history of slavery in Little Compton and now offers a book and a special exhibition on the subject entitled “If Jane Should Want to Be Sold, Stories of Slavery, Indenture and Freedom in Little Compton, Rhode Island.”

The books’ author, Historical Society Managing Director, Marjory O’Toole became deeply engrossed in returning the stories of over 250 unfree people to the history of Little Compton, but she says the project took on special meaning in light of the thousands of people in the United States and across the globe who are still, for all intents and purposes, enslaved. She hopes her historical work will encourage the public to make connections between the past and the present, and take action against human trafficking today.

Other talks in the Slavery and Freedom Speakers series include:

On Wednesday, November 2 at the United Congregational Church on the Little Compton, Commons at 7 PM, Keith Stokes will present “American Irony—Slavery & Religious Freedom in Colonial Newport.” Mr. Stokes is the co-founder of the 1696 Heritage Group.

On January 25, 2017 at 7PM, at the Little Compton Community Center, Elon Cook, Program Manager & Curator of the new Center for Reconciliation for the Episcopal Diocese of Rhode Island will speak on the exciting work of the Center for Reconciliation and how institutions and individuals can collaborate to increase public knowledge about slavery and Rhode Island’s role in the international slave trade.

On Wednesday, February 1, 2017 at 7 PM at the Community Center, Jeffrey Fortin will present “Two Generations of Freedom: From Kofi to Paul Cuffe.”  Dr. Fortin is the Paul Cuffe Fellow at Mystic Seaport Museum and Assistant Professor of History at Emmanuel College. His book on the life of Paul Cuffe will be published soon.

Last in the series on Thursday, February 23, 2017 at 7PM at the Community Center, Tony Connors, President of the Westport Historical Society, will present “Westport’s Stories of Unfreedom” based on his extensive research using Westport’s primary source documents.